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Prodigal Questionnaire: Omega Seamaster 300

By on 15 October 2012 in Watches

Prodigal Questionnaire: Omega Seamaster 300
Omega Seamaster 300
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Vanity Fair has the Proust Questionnaire. Theirs is “candid, surprising, fascinating.” Ours? Not so much. It’s more: contrived, surpassed, fallacious.

We’re kidding of course. No way do the guys at Vanity Fair have a monopoly on revealing interview techniques. When it comes to penetrating the reasoning behind a watch-buying decision, we think you can’t do better than the Prodigal Questionnaire.

One watch. One decision. And 12 little questions that shine a probing, edifying light on them both.

Today, we’re putting Geoff Whitehouse, a PR Manager in the financial services industry, on the couch to examine his decision to buy an Omega Seamaster 300.

One o’clock: Where or how did you purchase this watch?

It’s actually my most recent watch purchase. I’d been looking for a birth year, or as close to, watch for around three years and not knowing too much about ‘vintage’ time pieces had been taking my time, researching various brands and models. I originally took the plunge on an entirely different watch but it turned out to be, if I’m polite, a total piece of crap. So lesson learnt I decided to forget about the whole vintage watch idea.

Then completely by chance I stumbled across this 300 on TZ-UK and it ticked all the boxes. A classic Omega design for the period, just the right size for my pathetically small wrist and crucially had been worked on by a respected vintage Omega specialist. When I say ‘worked on’ purists may now want to avert their eyes… it has a 522 movement, correct for this watch but sourced from a Genève, and new case supplied by Omega who still make them, albeit under a new reference number.

I realise to some this is akin to heresy but it’s worth remembering that the Seamaster 300 was not originally produced in large numbers. It was also generally bought as a day-to-day watch, so they were quite rightly used and abused meaning the number of mint or even semi-decent vintage pieces is small and command a premium. I wanted something that could be used as an everyday watch not one that would only be bought out a few times a year.

Two o’clock: What living person is it most like?

John Hurt. Bit of an upstart when it arrived but matured well with age, gaining a loyal following along the way and now considered one of the finest of its generation.

Three o’clock: What is the watch’s greatest achievement?

It’s often imitated but never bettered. The 522 is a classic Omega in-house movement and to top it all that Seamaster script on the dial…honestly, who couldn’t love that? Compare it to the current watch bearing the same name and it’s in a different league.

Four o’clock: What talent would it most like to have?

I think it would like to be its true self…it’s not a real vintage 300. It doesn’t have the lovely patina of a watch of its age, so I suppose it lacks ‘purity’ in that sense.

Five o’clock: Where should the watch live?

Anywhere. It’s a chameleon, adapting to its surroundings, which was part of the attraction. Equally at home in a work surrounding or something more casual.

Six o’clock: Which hero of fiction wears or should wear this watch?

Indiana Jones. Rugged enough to survive his many adventures and would still look equally good when espousing archaeological theory in the classroom of Marshall College. And yes I do realise it’s completely the wrong era!

Seven o’clock: What are its real life heroes?

Most likely Nuno Gomes, the current holder of the world record deep dive. If only this watch to go to those depths the truly would live up to its name.

Eight o’clock: What’s your greatest regret about buying this watch?

Only that it will now mostly likely spur me on to buy an older model Speedmaster too.

Nine o’clock: If it had a name, what would it be?

I wanted to think of something witty but decided to be literal. Dante – enduring

Ten o’clock: What do you most value about this watch?

Having been on a bit of a journey to find the ‘right’ watch, discovering it was a very happy day. Even when I’m not wearing it, I go and put it on my wrist for a few minutes each day just to look at it.

Eleven o’clock: What is the trait you most deplore in it?

It really needs to stop losing 5 seconds a day like some sort of horological drunk.

Twelve o’clock: Keep, sell or trade?

Keep. No question.

 

Who’s next on the couch?

One watch. One decision. And 12 little questions that shine a probing, edifying light on them both.

If you would like to be the subject of PQ, drop us a line together with the details of the watch you own.

 

Article

Prodigal Questionnaire: Omega Seamaster 300

Vanity Fair has the Proust Questionnaire. Theirs is “candid, surprising, fascinating.” Ours? Not so much. It’s more: contrived, surpassed, fallacious. We’re kidding of course. No way do the guys at Vanity Fair have a monopoly on revealing interview techniques. When it comes to penetrating the reasoning behind a watch-buying decision, we think you can’t do […]

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Our editor-in-chief, the self-proclaimed "greatest wit, raconteur and bon vivant of our age", borders on delusional. Over the years, the fool has squandered more money on fast cars, Swiss watches and electronic gadgetry of all kinds than he – or Mrs Fool – cares to remember. Come nightfall, he can invariably be found stumbling out of Dukes mumbling “just one more Martini; I could have handled just one mmmmm… [thud!]”

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  • Richard

    Only one watch photo?

    • http://www.TheProdigalGuide.com The Prodigal Fool

      I know, right? Come on, Geoff. Send us more photos to satiate the watch porn addicts over here!

  • j haynes

    Fool, Great article. Straight Six recently was kind enough to provide us with a list of his current watch collection – essential info for us aspiring collectors. Would be v helpful if you could do the same when you have a mom. Thanks.

    • http://www.TheProdigalGuide.com The Prodigal Fool

      Six is a show off.

      • http://www.TheProdigalGuide.com Straight-Six

        And the Fool likes to stay inside the closet. In the largest sense of the word…

  • Matt

    lovely watch Geoff. Lovely.

  • Tom

    I have the same “unpure” Seamaster 300M and I agree 100%…it is a great watch with wrist presence, good size, classic looks, and frankly there are few things better than going through a tunnel, glancing at your wrist and seeing that beautiful luminous dial and hands. Best of both worlds!!